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The Road to Cold War Communism

The Road to Cold War Communism

Cold War is always viewed as the political rivalry between the United States and the Soviet Union. The United States was supported by its allies, the Western Bloc, while the Eastern Bloc supported the Soviet Union. The main cause of the Cold War was attributed to the different political ideologies between the United States and Soviet Union whereby the United States advocated for capitalism while the Soviet Union supported the communism. Capitalism is based on the premises of democratic government whereby the property is privately owned whereas communism argues for the totalitarian government where the resources including the property are owned by the state. As the competition between the two nations continued, other nations found themselves the victims too, for example, East Germany and Hungary. In many aspects, East Germany has been labelled as the first child of the cold war since it is the first nation to experience the real effects of war after it was occupied by the Soviet Union. Similarly, Hungary found itself entangled in the horns of Cold War when the Soviet Union invaded it after World War II. The communism aspects in the two nations ended with the disintegration of the Soviet Union in 1991. The collapse of communism in the two countries, East Germany and Hungary, can be related to the road leading from Cold War communism since as the communism continued to weaken, likewise, the impacts of Cold War communism in the two nations continued to wither. THIS IS A PREVIEW ORDER YOUR PAPER NOW

Ash noted that 1989 marked an important step in international politics since the ending of World War II in 1945. It is the year when communism in Europe ended, Soviet Union collapsed, and the Cold War came into an end. The above events were followed by Germany unification which had been divided into East and West Germany. Ash attributed the collapse of communism

Ash, Timothy Garton. The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and   Prague. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group: New York, 2010.  ORDER YOUR PAPER NOW

Bibliography

Ash, Timothy Garton. The Magic Lantern: The Revolution of ’89 Witnessed in Warsaw, Budapest, Berlin, and Prague. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group: New York, 2010.

Israel, Getzler Kronstadt. 1917-1921: The Fate of Soviet Democracy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983.

McKay & Crowston. A History of Western Society Ch. 30 Life in an Age of Globalization, 1990 to the Present. 1990.

Panteleymon, Romanov. About Cows,” The Fatal Eggs and Other Soviet Satire 1918-1963, Mirra Ginsburg trans. New York: Grove Press, 1964.

Willy, Brandt. “The Means Short of War.” Foreign Affairs 39, no. 2 (1961): 196-207.

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