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Problem Based Lesson Plan

Problem Based Lesson Plan

Problem-Based Lesson Plan
Science naturally incorporates multiple content areas. Consider language as a means of communication is a basic scientific process discussed in Topic 1. Mathematics is used to obtain measurements and graph data, and social studies provides a link between the application of science and society. When science curriculum is integrated across multiple content areas students experience more meaningful and relevant learning. A problem-centered approach where students investigate problems in which they are interested reinforces positive attitudes towards science and learning in general.

For this assignment, create an integrated problem-based lesson plan for one of the lessons in your unit plan. Use the “COE Lesson Plan Template” to design a lesson that incorporates the following:

Feedback from your mentor teacher about appropriate strategies, accommodations, resources and materials that will allow for differentiated instruction to meet
At least one additional content area standard that will be integrated into the lesson plan. (This content area will also be integrated into the lesson plans you will complete in Topic 7 for the benchmark assignment.)
Following the lesson plan, write a 150-250 word reflection, provide a rationale for why you included the additional content area, and how it best integrates with problem-based instruction in the science content of your unit.

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Problem Based Lesson Plan Example

Section 1: Lesson Preparation

Teacher Candidate Name:  
Grade Level: 1st Grade
Date: August 23, 2020
Unit/Subject:

 

Life Science
Instructional Plan Title: Utilization of External Features in Plants and Animals 
Lesson Summary and Focus: The central focus of the lesson will be to enable learners to understand how plants and animals use their external features to meet their needs. The integration component will focus on the differences between plants and animals.
Classroom and Student Factors/Grouping: Learners at the first grade level may easily lose concentration. To address the low concentration level, the learning activities will be made as interesting as possible. To ensure that all learners acquire knowledge, teaching will be more individualized to meet the varied needs of the learners.
National/State Learning Standards: Lousiana Science Standard S1-E-A1: Learners’ ability to develop inquiry traits.

Lousiana Science Standard S1-E-A2: Learners’ ability to individually investigate the use of the external features in plants and animals.

Lousiana Science Standard S1-E-A3: Learners’ ability to use scientific language to communicate the observations made.

language in its entirety.

Specific Learning Target(s)/Objectives: By the end of the lesson, the learner should be able to:

  • Identify the external features of both plants and animals.
  • Describe how the external features of animals and plants are used to meet their needs.
  • Explain at least three differences between plants and animals.
Academic Language
  • Leaf
  • Root
  • Stem
  • Flower
  • Fruit
  • Head
  • Stomach
  • Legs
  • Hands
  • Survival
  • Reproduction

The terms will be taught mainly through illustration and description. I will make labelled charts to make the learners understand some of the terms much better. I will describe terms which cannot be illustrated using simple language and familiar references.

Resources, Materials, Equipment, and Technology: Labelled charts

Chart on the uses of various external parts of plants and animals

A smartboard

Flashcards

Printed notes

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 Section 2: Instructional Planning

Anticipatory Set

·         I will ask the learners the external features of plants and animals and record them on the smartboard

·         I will distribute the flashcards to the learners and ask them to identify the features which have not been mentioned.

Time Needed
Multiple Means of Representation

  • I will display the labelled charts to help the learners understand the locations of different external features in both plants and animals.
  • I will ask the learners to touch certain external features in their bodies to make the lesson more interesting and meaningful.
  • I will ask the learners the roles performed by various external features in plants and animals.
Time Needed
Multiple Means of Engagement

·         I will display the chart showing the functions of the different external features of plants and animals and assign individual learners reading roles. The learners will be encouraged to read aloud.

·         I will give the learners the Printed notes and ask them to red them in groups of two.

·         I will ask the learners to identify the features in the notes that were not present on the labelled charts.

·         I will ask the learners to write down the differences between plants and animals in groups of two.

·         I will ask those who finish up the exercise first to exchange with other groups and determine the differences in their responses.

Time Needed
Multiple Means of Expression

Students will be required to write down a short paragraph on what they have learnt including the external features of plants of animals and how they use them to meet their needs and the differences between plants and animals. The paragraph should be written using complete sentence structures and integrate the key lesson terminologies. The learners will also be required to respond to oral questions about the lesson content.

Time Needed
 
Extension Activity and/or Homework

The students will be required to draw two separate plant and animal structures and label all the external features. This exercise will enable them to further understand the content and relate it to the real life animal and plant structures.

Time Needed

Plant and animal structures are essential for their growth and survival. Learners need to understand that the external features play different roles which cumulatively help plants and animals to meet their needs. The use of the external features among both plants and animals can best be understood through differentiation. The integration of the additional content area (differences between plants and animals) was therefore vital to enable the learners understand why plants and animals are structured differently. The differences between plants and animals contribute to specialization which helps in meeting certain levels of needs. The differences between plants and animals also explain why it is so easy for them to exist within the same environment. The differences contribute positively to a level of dependability which facilitates the roles of the external features. For example, most animals depend on plants for food. Similarly, the plants depend on animals for seed dispersal and manure which facilitates growth.

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