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Evolution of Bloom’s Taxonomy

Evolution of Bloom’s Taxonomy

Child Development, Learning Styles And Learning Taxonomies

A further training event for new teachers will focus on learning taxonomies. Produce materials for presentation which describes the evolution of bloom’s taxonomy and its use in teaching and learning and differentiates between bloom’s taxonomy and revised Blooms taxonomy
Evolution Of Bloom’s Taxonomy
Description of the evolution of bloom’s taxonomy is clear and detailed demonstrating evident understanding of the taxonomy
Differentiate Between Bloom’s Taxonomy And Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy
Differentiation between bloom’s taxonomy and revised bloom’s taxonomy is clearly explained with reasoning and examples

The Evolution of Bloom’s Taxonomy and its use in Teaching and Learning 

The taxonomy of Bloom is a framework that aims at giving educators an opportunity of setting correct goals that support the learning process. It is a vital tool for the classification of the learning behaviors, and it was developed by Benjamin Bloom in 1956 to help educators in developing structures as well as an understanding of how learners think (Gul, Kanwal, & Khan, 2020). Educators apply the taxonomy of Bloom by asking questions that directly relate to particular learning goals in every stage. For instance, using multiple-choice assignments can help in gauging the level of the student’s basic understanding of a matter. According to the taxonomy of Bloom, it is essential that in every learning environment, learning skills should begin from the bottom to the top of the pyramid. The lower level skills need less cognitive processing, however, it offers a crucial base for learning, and the higher-level skills need deeper learning.

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The Original Bloom’s Taxonomy

Bloom’s Taxonomy has been widely used as an important tool for learning, and the original taxonomy of Bloom described three learning domains which were cognitive (mental skills), affective (attitude) as well as psychomotor (physical skills). The cognitive domain was further divided into mental skills, which were Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation, and they were acquired sequentially (Gul, Kanwal, & Khan, 2020). As learners go through every pyramid level in the taxonomy of Bloom, they acquire basic learning and a deeper understanding of a matter. Therefore the main objective or goal at the end of every learning lesson is that the learners will have received new knowledge, attitudes, and skills towards a certain matter or subject. The original taxonomy of Bloom had lower thinking skills at the bottom while the higher thinking skills were at the top of the pyramid.

Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy

Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy refers to the framework that adjusted the original taxonomy of Bloom, and a group of psychologist and researchers did it in 2001 (Polat & Turan, 2020). The psychologists and researchers rearranged the levels and changed the terms of the original version from the nouns to the verbs. The new skills as per Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy are Remembering, Understanding, Applying, Analyzing, Evaluating, and Creating instead of Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation (Nelson, Pender, Myers, & Sheperis, 2020). The use of the verbs in replacing the nouns in the revised taxonomy of Bloom provides students with very clear goals as to what is anticipated of them.  Just like the original taxonomy of Bloom, the lower thinking skills are found at the bottom, whereas the higher thinking skills are found at the top of the pyramid.  The revised taxonomy emphasizes the analysis of some skills before using them in creating something new. In addition, every skill is now divided along the dimension of knowledge, which may be factual, meta-cognitive, procedural, and conceptual. The matrix arrangement of the version of Bloom’s taxonomy is intended to support teachers in creating clear objectives aimed at lesson planning as well as student evaluation.

Educators apply the taxonomy of Bloom by asking questions that directly relate to particular learning goals in every stage of the pyramid.  For instance, teachers use the taxonomy of Bloom to focus on particular parts that show proper cognitive skills in every examination allowing learners to have clear and measurable objectives (Nelson, Pender, Myers, & Sheperis, 2020). Bloom’s taxonomy helps teachers to plan learning lessons that ensure learners’ development is maximized.  It also provides a good foundation since it can be utilized in delivering suitable activities, evaluation, objectives, and questioning.

References

Gul, R., Kanwal, S., & Khan, S. S. (2020). Preferences of the Teachers in Employing Revised looms Taxonomy in their Instructions. Sir Syed Journal of Education & Social Research3(2), 258-266. https://doi.org/10.36902/sjesr-vol3-iss2-2020(258-266)

Nelson, J. S., Pender, D. A., Myers, C. E., & Sheperis, D. (2020). The Effect of Affect:    Krathwohl and Bloom’s Affective Domains Underutilized in Counselor Education. The  Journal of Counselor Preparation and Supervision13(1), 1.

Polat, S., & Turan, F. (2020). Analysis of the Objectives and Teacher Practices in Preschool Curriculum in Terms of Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy. International Journal of Social,  Political and Economic Research7(2), 292-310. https://doi.org/10.46291/IJOSPERvol7iss2pp292-310

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