Since the beginning of 21st-century terrorism has been one of the major threats to the global community. Currently, several terrorist groups like ISIS, Boko Haram, Taliban, and Al-Shabaab are sponsoring terrorist activities in their countries as well in other nations. Despite the increased terrorist threats, nations seem to be doing little to combat dreadful terrorist activities. The inability to get rid of this security issue can be attributed to the pervasive technology that aids terrorists to widen their network including coordination of activities. As such, the United States, the superior and most technologically and militarily developed country in the world is also living under the fear of terrorism. If America can whimper because of terrorism, then terrorism is a critical global problem without any particular nation deemed to have the possible solution. Global terrorist attacks have had severe impacts including psychological trauma and instilling fear on the victims. For example, September 11, 2001, which was carried on the American soil caused severe injuries, deaths and psychological suffering among the victims. Following the September 11 attack, the United States developed some security departments which have been effective in counteracting terrorism activities in the country. The success of the anti-terrorism departments could not have been achieved without the combined efforts of other security organs in America (Holgersson & Strandh, 2016). In America, security agencies have been established to deal with terrorism at different levels. The federal government undertakes most of the efforts to cut off terrorist activities, and it in the light of counterterrorism agencies at the federal level: the research paper highlights the U.S. government’s role in homeland security programs; examines the motivation of terrorist group activities against the Americans and identifies the strengths and weaknesses of American homeland security’s counterterrorism policies and tactical response options to terrorism.